Spring Lawn Care Tips & Bay-Friendly Lawn Workshop

Spring appears to be on schedule for most of Maryland as temperatures are slowly creeping up into the 50’s and 60’s for highs. One of the temptations for homeowners is to fertilize the lawn “to get the grass going” in the spring. Keep in mind that “spring green-up” is largely related to soil temperatures and, to some degree, whether fertilizer was applied in the fall. Fertilizing with the goal of getting the grass to “wake up” sooner will have a minimal effect since soil temperature is the main driver for this.

lawn grass
Spring “green-up” is largely related to warming temperature. Most fertilizing for the year should be done in the fall. Photo: Pixabay

Also, keep in mind that fertilizing in the spring favors more shoot and leaf growth at the expense of root growth. (Fertilizing in the fall tends to favor root growth. Most of the fertilizing for the year should be done in the fall.) Spring fertilization should consist of ~1 lb. nitrogen/1000 sq. ft. total in spring. Using a slow-release fertilizer or splitting applications into two 1/2 lb. rates spaced about one month apart should help to limit excessive growth that could add to the increased mowing frequency often necessary in the spring. Continue reading

What Can I Do About All These Weeds?

Ground Ivy
Ground ivy or creeping Charlie (Glechoma hederacea). Photo by Betty Marose

The famous quotation about the certainties of life which we all know includes death and taxes should also mention weeds! They are sprouting up all over. Even the most meticulously tended landscapes are not immune.

Where to Begin?

The first step is identification. You need to know your opponent. Control is more attainable if you know whether it is a grassy or broadleaf weed. Is it an annual, perennial or biennial? When does it germinate? Fall, spring, or summer?

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Get Your Lawn Back in Shape This September

With summer winding down — nights are getting longer and days getting cooler — September is a perfect time to rejuvenate tall fescue lawns. Aerating and overseeding now in the fall will make your lawn stronger and better able to resist pests and weed encroachment for next season.

Here are a few points to remember when aerating and overseeding for a lawn rejuvenation this fall:

  • The aerator you use makes a difference. A heavier, more powerful (> 5 HP) aerator will be more forceful and more effective in creating deeper cores. Ideally, you should be able to aerify to a soil depth of at least 3-4”.  Equipment rental stores often have suitable aerating machines available. Remember not to go over the lawn too fast and allow the machine to just “bump” along. Travelling slowly and ensuring the area isn’t too dry will help encourage quality cores to be pulled from the soil.

    Lawn aerator
    Aerifying in fall provides more oxygen to the roots and protected holes for new seed to germinate.
  • If you have substantial areas of dead grass or crabgrass weeds, it is probably more effective to remove the dead grass leaves with a hard rake, a “power rake”, or a de-thatcher. The turf seed will need to have good soil contact in order to germinate and grow to provide better coverage. By seeding into an area with a lot of dead debris, the seed may germinate and then dry out – or not “take” at all.

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