Outsmart Squash Vine Borers This Season – Featured Video

Do your squash plants look wilted in the summer? There could be an invisible enemy larva eating your plant stems from the inside out. And worse yet, typically there is more than one miner inside!

This troubling pest, squash vine borer, seems to hit everyone’s garden in the eastern United States! The borer pest is very hard to control since targeting the egg-laying clearwing moth is like throwing darts in the night. Honestly, it is best to plant squash plants at different time intervals to increase your chance of missing the egg-laying time. Early transplant squash can beat out the egg layers and then late season squash can miss them.

Plan your garden accordingly this year, and you may be able to avoid most of the vine borer problems!

HGIC Website: Squash Vine Borers

Joyce Browning Horticulturist, Master Gardener Coordinator Video credit: Bethany Evans Longwood Gardens Professional Gardener Program Alumni; CPH

3 Comments on “Outsmart Squash Vine Borers This Season – Featured Video

  1. but is DiamEarth -proven- to prevent SVB?
    In Maryland, define ‘early’ and ‘late’ plantings please.
    Other than Hubbard(mentioned), which winter/hard squash are resistant?

    • define early and late squash planting to deter vine bore

  2. Diatomaceous earth can discourage feeding by different types of insects and slugs, but it is not proven to prevent SVB. (For example, the insects could get around where it is applied or where it has washed off). Planting time will vary by location. Set out 3-4 week old transplants after the danger of frost has passed in your area and cover the plants with row cover until they flower. Or, direct sow seeds in mid-June and cover them with row cover until they flower. Other than Hubbard, Butternut squash, Tromboncino, and Cushaw are some squashes that are more resistant to SVB. https://extension.umd.edu/resource/squash-vine-borer-vegetables

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