Our Favorite Trees

What are your favorite trees? The Watershed Restoration Specialists from the University of Maryland Extension Sea Grant Program recently shared what their favorite trees are and why.

As Watershed Specialists, we spend a lot of time helping people decide which species of trees might be best for a particular project based on a variety of factors including
sun, soils, and size. Every now and then, people will also see if they can add their favorite tree to the project. Now the number of reasons why people like a particular tree is
probably rivaled by the number of grains of sand on the beach and there’s not enough room in this article to list them all. But this got me to thinking; we spend so much
time talking to other people about trees, I wonder what our favorite ones are? Well, below is the answer to that very question. And after reading this, drop any one of us an email and let us know what your favorite tree is and why.

paw paw tree flowers and fruits

Paw Paw

Amanda – Paw Paw (Asimina triloba)
As an eastern North American native species, not only does Paw Paw have a very distinctive flower, it produces one of the largest edible fruits of all our native trees. The main reason this is Amanda’s choice of favorite native tree is that her son loves the fruit! And because of recent interest in Paw Paw fruit, it has earned the nickname Hipster Banana.

Jackie – Red Maple (Acer rubrum)
Red Maples live up to their name: they give us that first shimmer of red in early spring with its flowers and seeds and wraps up the year with fiery red leaves in the fall. Even
though its nickname is Swamp Maple, Jackie appreciates Red Maples not only for their color, she’s actually made syrup from its sap!

red maple tree and flowers

Red Maple

Kelsey – Willow Oak (Quercus phellos)
A tree she grew up with in her home state of Michigan, Kelsey’s favorite is the Willow Oak. This fast-growing species produces plenty of acorns which keeps the squirrels busy, it also casts a great shadow on her apartment, something she appreciates during the summer months.

willow oak trees and acorn

Willow Oak

Jennifer – Tulip Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera)
Earning its name from a coffee-cup sized flower that people don’t often see since they’re so high up in the tree, the Tulip Poplar is Jen’s favorite. This tall growing tree is important to a number of birds and butterflies. And its cat-shaped leaf reminds her of the two felines that are really in charge of her house.

tulip poplar tree flower and leaf

Tulip Poplar

Eric – Black Gum (Nyssa sylvatica)
My fave is the Black Gum. I grew to appreciate it over time because of the wide variety of conditions it grows in. And when people tell me they love the red color of a Burning Bush, which can invade natural areas, I often suggest that plants like Black Gum not only have a beautiful red color, they produce flowers and fruit that are beneficial to native insects and animals.

black gum tree red foliage

Black Gum

By Eric Buehl, Senior Agent Associate, Sea Grant Extension Programs. This article was published originally in the Maryland Sea Grant Headwaters Newsletter, October 2019.

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